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Airport Security and Metal Implants

There’s one thing to know to make your screening go smoothly.

Do I need a joint replacement?

Whether you are starting to experience pain and loss of mobility in your hips or knees,  have been treating joint pain for some time, are about to have or had surgery already, we can help you take an active role in improving the health of your joints.

Find a Doctor

Find a hip and knee replacement specialist who is a member of AAHKS.

Flyer for Your Practice

AAHKS has made this flyer available for surgeons’ offices to download, print and include in your patients’ take-home materials. It includes the website address and a scannable code for smart phones.

Considering Joint Replacement Surgery

When you’ve made the decision to have joint replacement surgery, use these resources to supplement discussions with your surgeon.

Learn about osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis affects over 27 million individuals in the United States alone.

Set expectations.

Have an open discussion with your surgeon about function after surgery.

Get answers.

We answer commonly asked questions about recovery following surgery.

Videos

The following videos will show you what to expect during joint replacement surgery in a condensed timeframe and also the exercises you can do at home before and after your surgery. WARNING: Some of these videos are of actual surgeries in operating rooms. If you are uncomfortable with the sight of blood, tissue and bone, we recommend you read the articles in our Hip and Knee Care Library instead.

Total Knee exam

Total Knee Replacement

Observe a total knee replacement surgery where the surgeon replaces components of the knee with implants.

Total Hip Replacement | Mini-Posterior Approach

Observe a total hip replacement surgery where the surgeon accesses the joint from the back of the hip.

knee exam

Partial Knee Replacement

Observe a partial knee replacement surgery where the surgeon replaces a portion of the knee with implants.

hip exam

Total Hip Replacement | Anterior Approach

Observe a total hip replacement surgery where the surgeon accesses the joint from the front of the hip.

hamstring stretch

At-Home Exercises Before Hip or Knee Replacement

These exercises will help you prepare for your joint replacement surgery so you can get back to the activities you enjoy.

knee exam

At-Home Stretching Exercises for Hip or Knee Replacement

Follow along with this video at home and do basic stretches before and after your hip or knee replacement surgery.

hip exam

At-Home Exercises After Hip Replacement

You can follow along with this video and do basic physical therapy exercises at home after your hip replacement surgery.

knee exam

At-Home Exercises After Knee Replacement

This video shows basic physical therapy exercises that you can do at home after your knee replacement surgery.

Living with a New Joint

If you’ve had a hip or knee replaced, you may have some questions about day-to-day activities.

Will I set off airport metal detectors?

Many commonly used orthopaedic implants may set off metal detectors at airport security. In fact, over 90% of implants will. Learn how to discretely inform TSA of your implants.

Help, I can’t sleep!

One of the most frequent complaints after total joint replacement is difficulty sleeping. Your sleep disruption is likely caused by pain. Learn how to get a good night’s sleep after surgery.

Is it safe to have sex after surgery?

It’s important to set realistic expectations and learn how to safely resume sexual activity after joint replacement while avoiding complications. See what surgeons reccomend and don’t reccomend.

Can I play sports after knee replacement?

The forces applied to a knee implant are much higher while playing sports than during regular daily activities. This can cause wear and tear on the implants. Lean what you can and can’t do with your new knee.

Hip and Knee Care Library

These articles have been written and peer reviewed by surgeon members of the AAHKS Patient Education Committee.

Hip Care

Total Hip Replacement

The first step when making the decision about hip replacement is to meet with your surgeon to see if you are a candidate for total hip replacement surgery.

Surgical Options for Hip Arthritis

When non-surgical treatments for hip arthritis fail, you and your doctor may consider hip surgery.

What Are Hip and Knee Replacement Implants Made Of?

Learn about the parts of an implant and the materials used.

Total Joint Replacement: A Breakdown of Costs

Many factors determine the cost of total joint replacement surgery in the U.S.

Knee Care

Total Knee Replacement

The first step when making the decision about knee replacement is to meet with your surgeon to see if you are a candidate for total knee replacement surgery.

Surgical Options for Knee Arthritis

When non-surgical treatments for knee arthritis fail, you and your doctor may consider knee surgery.

Full or Partial Knee Replacement

While it may seem appealing to have half of a surgery compared to a full surgery, it is important to understand the differences between a partial and a total knee replacement surgery.

Resuming Sports after Knee Surgery

If you are considering total knee replacement, you should discuss with your surgeon the possibility of participating in physical activities such as sports following surgery.

What are Hip and Knee Replacement Implants Made Of?

Learn about the parts of an implant and the materials used.

Total Joint Replacement: A Breakdown of Costs

Many factors determine the cost of total joint replacement surgery in the U.S.

Getting Ready for Surgery

Choosing the Right Surgeon for You

Choosing the right surgeon is important, and it can be a daunting task. There are several ways to find a surgeon who is right for you. 

Setting Expectations

If you are considering joint replacement surgery, you should have a discussion with your surgeon about pain relief and function after surgery.

Opioid Use Before Hip or Knee Surgery Can Mean Trouble

Opioids are not a viable treatment option for the vast majority of patients. 

Outpatient Surgery

Outpatient joint replacement surgery is new, and orthopedic surgeons are still clarifying how to maximize the benefits of this idea for patients.

Medical Tourism

When planning where to have surgery, take note of the advantages and disadvantages of  traveling far from home.

Allergic or Sensitive to Metal?

If you have an allergy or sensitivity to metal, then it is important to alert your surgeon prior to having joint replacement surgery.

How to Get the Most Out of Your Joint Replacement

Studies have shown that there are steps you can take before and after surgery to improve the likelihood that you are satisfied with the results.

Quit Smoking Before Surgery

Quitting smoking is one of the most critical things to do in preparation for hip or knee replacement surgery so that your surgery will be successful.

Recovering after Surgery

How to Relieve Pain after Hip or Knee Surgery

There are a variety of ways to help reduce pain after surgery that don’t involve opioids.

Recovery after Surgery

Here are frequently asked questions about recovery after hip or knee replacement surgery.

Going Home after Joint Replacement Surgery

You may get better quicker if you make a plan and recover at home.

Traveling After Surgery

There are precautions to take if you plan to travel soon after having joint surgery.

Living with Your New Joint

Getting a Good Night's Sleep

One of the most common complaints after total joint replacement is difficulty sleeping.

Antibiotics at the Dentist

During a dental procedure, it is possible for bacteria from the mouth, teeth or gums to travel through the bloodstream and settle in an artificial joint.

Airport Metal Detectors

Many implants now include ceramic and plastic materials in addition to metal, and the metal will likely cause an alarm.

About Recalls

Recalls of hip and knee replacement implants can cause understandable concern on the part of both patients and physicians.

Joint Replacement and Your Health

Osteoarthritis FAQ

Osteoarthritis is a common disorder that affects the joints and is caused by a loss of cartilage. Here are frequently asked questions about osteoarthritis.

Don't Take Your New Joint for Granted - Follow-up Care

Follow up with your surgeon as part of long-term care for your joint replacement.

Decreasing Your Risk of Infection

Your overall health is very important to prevent infection, and being in good health before surgery could decrease your surgical infection risk. 

Good Health=Good Recovery

Your overall health is important and can have a major impact on how well you do after hip or knee replacement surgery.

Resuming Sex after Joint Surgery

Joint pain, stiffness and deformity can limit sexual activity if you have hip or knee arthritis. 

Nonsurgical and Other Options

Relieving Hip and Knee Pain without Surgery

If your doctor is not recommending surgery for your hip or knee joints at this time, there are some other ways to alleviate pain and improve mobility.

Stem Cell Therapy

While it often sounds appealing, stem cell therapy is a new treatment that is poorly understood.

PRP Injections

There have been some studies examining the use of PRP for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee.

Finding Credible Resources

It is important to seek legitimate sources such as the AAHKS website for accurate information about your health care.

Completing Your Survey Helps Everyone

If the hospital, surgical care center, insurance or device manufacturer involved in your hip or knee replacement surgery has asked you to complete a survey about your experience, please do! These surveys collect information from people who have been through the surgery and puts the data into an anonymous database called a “registry.” Doctors and their surgical teams use this data to do research and improve the way they practice. The more people who complete the surveys, the better hip and knee surgical care will be for everyone in the future. To learn more about patient reported outcome (PRO) surveys, visit the blog of the AAOS American Joint Replacement Registry – the official Registry of AAHKS.

Learn what it means to be a member of AAHKS.

There are over 4,000 members of AAHKS, and the number grows each year. The aim of this medical specialty society is to promote the advancement of hip and knee care through education, advocacy and research.

Why do surgeons attend the AAHKS Annual Meeting?

If you’ve tried to see your surgeon in early November, chances are they were attending the AAHKS Annual Meeting. Find out why this is “The Most Important Meeting
on Adult Reconstruction in the World.”

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